Holla holla holla

Life is too important to be taken seriously.
-Oscar Wilde

tuneage:

Nicki Minaj - Anaconda

Some questions are more important than their answers. Are we alone in the universe? Is there a God? Does life have objective meaning, or is it something we project purpose onto, in vain attempts to protect our fragile egos?

To these inquiries, Nicki Minaj has added one more: How much booty is too much? 

With Anaconda, she takes us to a world where ass is king (or should I say queen?) It would be easy to see this video as the ultimate realization of music’s harmful objectification of women. But after first presenting a girls-only twerking paradise, Nicki introduces a man into the picture with a disconcerting cameo by Drake. Here is a vision of a woman clearly in control, and a man left helpless and awestruck. It presents woman as object, but also as subject; as both image and agent, a duality essential to sex, but also to commercial music. And like so many of the identities Nicki adopts — rapper and pop singer, superhero and Barbie — these roles are all the more engaging for their contradictions. 

Some questions will go forever unanswered. But that does not make them any less worth asking, just as Anaconda’s sexy surface is worth unpacking. And besides, look at her butt

Anonymous asked: idk why people are calling you hot. you're really not, no offense

frenums:

you rn: sad insecure anon who sends unnecessary hate

me rn: beautiful goddess eating wheat bread w peanut butter

rafi-dangelo:

We’re not people really.  Our concerns are not America’s concerns.  We are just here for entertainment. We’re a convenient treasure trove of limitless creativity to be pillaged, watered down, and re-purposed for White audiences and the people getting rich from bastardized stereotypes and simplified caricatures of everything we bring to the table have nothing to say when shit gets really real.

(via my-little-underground)

femprivilege:

"I think that people want homophobia to change in black America the way that homophobia changed in white America, but it’s not going to happen that way. It’s gonna happen in a way that is befitting to black culture. Everyone always knew Little Richard was gay, but because of his talent, people overlooked it. Dennis Rodman is heterosexual but was a public cross-dresser, but because he was such a good NBA player, people overlooked it. In black culture, talent has always been this big deal. In black culture, there is an ideology of support, of taking care of your people and your community. Changing homophobia is going to come from public figures and pastors telling their community to love their children, that lesbians and gays are your brothers and sisters, that you can be gay and that doesn’t make you less of a strong black man. Discrimination, segregation, and racism make people feel that they have to be strong. And people relate strength to masculinity. And people relate homosexuality to being the opposite of masculinity. When femininity is seen as a source of power in black culture, homophobia will no longer exist."

femprivilege:

"I think that people want homophobia to change in black America the way that homophobia changed in white America, but it’s not going to happen that way. It’s gonna happen in a way that is befitting to black culture. Everyone always knew Little Richard was gay, but because of his talent, people overlooked it. Dennis Rodman is heterosexual but was a public cross-dresser, but because he was such a good NBA player, people overlooked it. In black culture, talent has always been this big deal. In black culture, there is an ideology of support, of taking care of your people and your community. Changing homophobia is going to come from public figures and pastors telling their community to love their children, that lesbians and gays are your brothers and sisters, that you can be gay and that doesn’t make you less of a strong black man. Discrimination, segregation, and racism make people feel that they have to be strong. And people relate strength to masculinity. And people relate homosexuality to being the opposite of masculinity. When femininity is seen as a source of power in black culture, homophobia will no longer exist."

Mykki Blanco - “Haze.Boogie.Life” (Official Music Video)

(Source: youtube.com)